Skull & Crossed Bones Revealed!

Big day today; we finally tipped the gravestone fragment overlying the skull and crossed bones stone. These were most likely chucked in with the rubble in the 1920’s. Everytime we have turned a stone, hoping to reveal an inscription, we have been disappointed. Understandably, expectations were set low.

Planning, section drawing and excavation. What a talented group we are!
Planning, section drawing and excavation. What a talented group we are!
... and don't forget the sieving ...
… and don’t forget the sieving …
Conquering the summit of the spoil heap (without oxygen tank)
Conquering the summit of the spoil heap (without oxygen tank)
Learning the archaeologists' pose
Learning the archaeologists’ pose
Yet more finds found
Yet more finds found
Archaeologists are wary of being approached from behind
Archaeologists are wary of being approached from behind
Yuck! My glove!
Yuck! My glove!
Working on the section drawing
Working on the section drawing

Meanwhile, the west section of our eastern test pit was drawn. As soon as I remember to scan it I will add am image into this post. The leaders backfilled once members had left (we always save the best jobs for ourselves). We can now start on our last test pit in this phase of the excavation.

We finished the session with a low point; lifting and turning the stone overlying our skull and crossed bones. We were not disappointed in our disappointment.

Reverse of gravestone fragment
Reverse of gravestone fragment

One day we’ll come across the Dunfermline Graveyard equivalent to this recent photograph from Pompeii.

Pompeii victim not crushed by falling masonry
Pompeii Victim not crushed by falling masonry

Leave a Reply

Your e-mail address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.